PROCESS AND INSTALLATION FOR GENERATING A GRAVITATIONAL FIELD
U.S. Patent Application by Peter Bettels,  German Foreign Reference No. 19832.001.9,  Priority date:  July 16, 1998
 
 
 
 

Several  possibilities  exist  for  implementing  this  process ...


 


  One of them comprises setting a rotationally symmetrical body with at least one conductor in superconducting state, which extends radially or with radial components from the outside into the proximity of the axis, into rapid rotation and to enable electrons to flow in this conductor.  Even though the electrons move on radial paths, namely the conductors extending radially in or on the rotating body, their path is on a spiral course caused by the rapid rotation of the body.

  Another possibility comprises enabling the electrons to flow in a body in the form of a spiral conductor or a body provided with a spiral-form conductor, with the spiral-form conductor comprising many windings disposed in the form of a spiral, that for this purpose a conductor in superconducting state is used and that electrons flowing in this conductor are forced from an outer winding of large diameter onto an inner central winding of lesser diameter via the interspaced windings.

  The effect of gravitational force reduction achieved hereby can be enhanced thereby that the body comprising a spiral conductor or a body provided with a spiral-form
conductor is set into rotation.

  The invention creates above the rotating body a gravitational field which is weaker than the gravitational field without the rotating conductor through which flows a current under superconduction.  The invention combines the above listed observations on rotating bodies with the principle of conservation of angular momentum in the case of a mass disposed on the rotating disk, which is forced from an outer path of greater diameter onto an inner smaller path and which manifests itself through increasing path velocity although the angular velocity remains constant.

  This is attained through current transport in the specially structured, namely spiral-form, superconductor.  The current transport takes place exclusively through the electrons moving without resistance in the superconductor, which are guided within the conductor from the outer edge of the body in the form of a spiral toward the axis of the body.  Since the electrons are negatively charged, they migrate from the negative to the positive pole.  In the case of conventional metallic conductors the electric field propagates approximately at the speed of light even though the electrons themselves move only at 0.5 mm per second.  Copper has a current-carrying capacity of approximately 120 Amperes per cm² of cross section; in the case of superconductors 10,000 to 20,000 Amperes per cm2 are measured.  This means that the electrons have an incomparably higher mobility within the superconductor. This permits the acceleration of the electrons.  If onto the rotating spiral a DC voltage, smoothed as much as possible, is applied, at the outer edge of the spiral electrons are located with their mass which have at this site a kinetic energy corresponding to their path velocity and their distance from the axis of rotation.  Through the current conduction and the spiral-form of the spiral this electron impulse is forced into increasingly decreasing radii of rotation. The absence of resistance of the spiral material ensures the greatest possible mobility of the electrons.  But since the electrons are supplied with kinetic energy through the applied potential which, in turn, due to the absence of resistance, they cannot convert into heat through friction but only into velocity, the electrons are continuously accelerated in the spiral-form conductor.

   According to the theory of relativity the relativistic mass of any body increases with increasing velocity. This increase in mass has been measured and confirmed in
particle accelerators.  Since gravitation always occurs proportional to mass, a gravitational field is generated in the spiral which, in turn, shields the earth's gravitation in the region directly above it.

   Consequently, a spiral wound about an axis, which is comprised of a superconducting material, through which flows a current and which is made to rotate through a motor acting onto its shaft, causes shielding of the earth's gravitation.

      By the geometric guidance of the electrons on the spiral path, conditions are createdsuch as occur for air particles in a tornado. The superconductivity permits the electrons to flow at very high velocities with continuous further acceleration.   A type of stationary "electron tornado" develops which leads to the intended change of the gravitational field.

      The spiral material must be electrically insulated either through lacquer or a nonconducting separating layer.  It can comprise wire or a metal foil.  The nonexisting or nearly nonexisting resistance of the coil wire or the coil foil is critical and can be attained, for example, through high-temperature superconductors which are cooled with liquid nitrogen below their transition temperature, i.e. that temperature at which their resistance drops suddenly.  The spiral comprises two ends via which the voltage is carried, the one end is located at the axis, the other at the spiral edge.  During the rotation current conduction must be ensured either through
sliding contacts or frictionless through arcs on circular current collectors which encompass the spiral.

     Via these contacts a DC voltage is supplied thereby that to the axis the positive pole and to the outer edge the negative pole is connected.  The current transport takes place exclusively through the electrons which are guided in the form of a spiral within the conductor from the outer edge to the axis.  Since the electrons are
negatively charged, they migrate from the negative to the positive pole and thus from the outside to the inside.  This spiral is made to rotate about its axis and specifically counter to the direction of its winding.

  The form of the winding of the spiral can be planar like a plate thereby that the conductor is wound spirally in a plane.

  The form of the winding of the spiral can also be concave thereby that the conductor is spirally wound onto a conical surface or a surface of a truncated cone or any other curved rotationally symmetrical surface.

   When using a superconducting foil winding in which the conductor cross section increases from the axis toward the outer edge, the electrons are forced on their path
to the axis into a smaller cross section such that the voltage increases (tunneling).  In the case of a coil material with normal resistance the coils would burn through at this site, but since the superconducting materials have a conductivity of 10,000 to 20,000 Amperes per cm² of cross section, this is not possible. The increased flow of
electrons which occurs at constrictions of the cross section, can only be converted into increased velocity and not into heat due to the superconductivity.  With this
constriction of the cross section, the tunneling, waves have been accelerated to values greater than the speed of light although the speed of light has been considered until now as the absolute limit of all speeds.  Under conditions of superconductivity the behavior of the electrons is approximately analogous to that of waves in the tunnel.

  In this process the angular velocity of the rotating body can be kept constant and thereby an increasing path velocity of the electron current can be generated.

  But, it is also possible to change the angular velocity of the rotating body and thereby generate changing gravitational forces.

  These effects can be attained thereby that the conductor is disposed in a plane. But the conductor can also be disposed spirally on a conical surface or the surface of a
truncated cone or any other curved rotationally symmetrical surface.

  The installation for generating a positive or a negative gravitational field through the movement of electrons in a body for the generation of levitational effects can be
constructed and structured in various ways.

   One possibility comprises that in a rotationally symmetrically structured body at least one conductor in superconducting state is disposed, which extends radially or with radial components from the outside into the proximity of the axis, that a driving means is provided for this body which is set into rapid rotation and that at the two
ends of this conductor a potential is applied.

    A further possibility comprises that the body has the form of a spiral-form conductor or is provided with a spiral-form conductor with the spiral-form conductor
comprising many windings disposed or wound in spiral form, that the conductor is in a state of superconduction and that onto this conductor a potential is applied
which forces an electron flow from an outer winding of large diameter of this conductor onto an inner central path of smaller diameter via the windings disposed
between them.

  The attained effect of reduction of gravitation can be further enhanced thereby that a driving means is provided which sets the body with the spiral paths into rapid
rotation.

  It is useful for the rotating body to be connected to a stationary power source via sliding contacts or frictionless through arcs on circular current collectors
encompassing the spiral.

  The desired effect of reduction of gravitation is attained if the spiral is made to rotate about its axis counter to the direction of its winding.

  A further acceleration of the electrons can be achieved thereby that the cross section of the conductor decreases from an outer winding to a minimum value at an inner
centrally disposed winding.

  In this installation the angular velocity of the rotating body can be kept constant whereby an increasing velocity of the electron current is generated.

  But the angular velocity of the rotating body can also be variable whereby changing gravitational forces are generated.

  The conductor can be disposed in a plane but also on a conical surface or the surface of a truncated cone or any other curved rotationally symmetrical surface.

  The rotating body can be connected to a stationary power source via sliding contacts or frictionless through arcs on circular current collectors encompassing the conductor.

  The cross section of the conductor can decrease from a maximum value at the outer edge of the body to a minimum value in the interior whereby a further acceleration
of the electrons is achieved.